MLL Delivers 25K to JDRF for Diabetes Research

Boston, MA - Major League Lacrosse (MLL), in conjunction with the New Balance Foundation, delivered a $25,000 check to JDRF, the leading global organization funding type 1 diabetes (T1D) research, during an on-field presentation at this season's MLL championship game on August 25. JDRF was named the official charity of the MLL All-Star Game, and MLL has been raising funds and awareness for T1D research since that event on July 13.

"JDRF is honored to have the generous support of Major League Lacrosse and the New Balance Foundation, whose donation is helping us toward our goal of progressively removing the burdens of type 1 diabetes," said Margo K. Lucero, JDRF's vice president of corporate development. "Thank you for your remarkable commitment to JDRF's cause. We're proud to be part of the team."

"We were delighted to deliver our donation to JDRF during our Championship Weekend festivities," said MLL Commissioner David Gross. "They do great work in the fight against type 1 diabetes."

MLL combined fundraising efforts surrounding the All-Star Game with a matching donation from the New Balance Foundation to raise $25,000, all of which was donated to JDRF in support of important T1D research. 38 selected All-Star players autographed their special edition game-worn jerseys, featuring the JDRF logo, and later auctioned them off to the public. A text-to-donate campaign was also established throughout the month of July, allowing the public to contribute funds through a mobile donating program.

This is the second season MLL and the New Balance Foundation have partnered with JDRF, previously the official charity of the 2011 MLL All-Star Game. This season's proceeds matched those of 2011, bringing the two-year total to $50,000. The funds raised will help JDRF in their goals of removing the impact of T1D from people's lives until a world without T1D is achieved.

In T1D, a person's pancreas stops producing insulin, a hormone that enables people to get energy from food. People with T1D need to test their blood sugar and give themselves insulin (with injections or an insulin pump) multiple times every day, and carefully balance insulin doses with eating and daily activities throughout the day and night. However, insulin is not a cure for diabetes, and even with that intensive care, a significant portion of the day is still spent with either high or low blood sugar, placing people with T1D at risk for devastating complications such as heart attack, stroke, blindness, and amputation.

2013-09-09



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